Sunday, 21 July 2013

Shipbuilding

Last night I water-lined the Nina model and began to tinker with it, to give it an appearance closer to that of a small Roman trade ship.


So far, this has involved removing the rudder and replacing part of the stern, and adding a curving stern post.  I increased the size of the hold-openings as the kit is 1/100 scale and my minis, 1/48.


Later I'll add masts, steering oars, an awning and deck clutter which will help it to feel more in-scale.

Curiously, I have seen illustrations of Roman ships that aren't a million miles off this.  I think it'll pass... might even be OK for the Rhine.  Which gives me another idea for what I could use this for...

14 comments:

James said...

Nicely done.

Matt said...

A very promising start! Look forward to seeing the finished article.

Matt

DeanM said...

Looking good - coincidentally I've was looking at these models recently too. I was thinking of doing up either a landship or airship for a WHFB Empire army. Good to see the quality of the models up close. Best, Dean

Paul´s Bods said...

I like it ..the Alteration to the Stern is clever.

BigRedBat said...

Hi Dean, I'm sure it would be worthwhile, especially if you could find a very baroque ship, perhaps a galleas?

After I've finished this one, I have a huge transport to tackle!

CelticCurmudgeon said...

Looking Good! while spending the past two months watching every episode of Time Team, one episode occured which is right on point - a Roman boat used in the Rhine trade. Gee...you really nailed it. The relative dimensions and overall shape are very similar. Well done, sir! well done.
Jerry
A/K/A The Celtic Curmudgeon

Dalauppror said...

Very nice so far !

Best regards Michael

Willie Anderson said...

Looking forward to seeing it finished Like Dean I have also been looking at these models must be something in the water!

BigRedBat said...

There's a lot more work in converting it than in buying resin, but I think the end product will be nicer.

What occurred to me earlier, was that the Nina hull, stripped down, would make a very good barge for the Roman pontoon bridge, that I have long coveted... but this would be a huge job. One for next year...

Cheers, Simon

Furt said...

Lovely - I think it will pass nicely.

Frank
http://adventuresinlead.blogspot.com.au/

Unknown said...

Following this with great deal of interest. I recently bought a couple of xebecs from OG and I'm on the lookout for some variation, cant wait to see your brushwork on this model.

roma912 said...

Interesting. I am curious as to how you waterlined the ship. I have a Viking long boat that needs the same treatment but have always been too chicken to try it.
Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Cheers, Ross

roma912 said...

Interesting. I am curious as to how you waterlined the ship. I have a Viking long boat that needs the same treatment but have always been too chicken to try it.
Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Cheers, Ross

BigRedBat said...

Hi Ross,

With guesswork, ans a sharp hacksaw!

I used the line of the planking to guide the cut. The tricky thing is to keep the saw perpendicular so as to not cut off too much material at the bow and the stern. I did in fact trim just a little too much away, but the gap will be covered by the green-stuff bow and stern waves.

Just go for it. :-)

Simon